Title

Supervising for success

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2-2018

Publication Title

The ASHA Leader

Medical Subject Headings

Speech Therapy/organization and administration, Personnel Management

Abstract

Your caseload is already high, paperwork screams for priority over student treatment, you have a complex case that requires some research and planning, and end-of-the-year IEP meetings will be here before you know it.

And now someone in administration approaches you with an idea: How about employing a speech-language pathology assistant?

Thinking of the training and supervision required, your immediate response might be, “You want me to do what? I can’t do everything I need to do now.”

But actually this could be just what you need. Bringing a speech-language pathology assistant (SLPA) on board can give you the opportunity to focus more on quality treatment and less on tasks that don’t require your specialized training and knowledge. Transitioning to this concept—known as working at the “top of the license”—is essential for creating fruitful partnerships among SLPs and SLPAs. But it likely does take some training, role adjustment, and a “mindset reset.”

Volume

23

Issue

2

First Page

36

Last Page

38

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